Active Transportation

Information bulletins have been developed for professionals and community members who want to build a case for active transportation in their community. Academic, government and non-government sources are used to build a strong case for implementing active transportation opportunities at the local level. Canadian sources are used whenever available. All bulletins are available in English and French.

Each bulletin includes evidence that supports the investment of time and resources for active transportation opportunities at the local level. They focus on designing communities for moving people and not cars. Recommended actions to increase and strengthen collaborative partnerships for active transportation are also included.

English

Bulletin 07: Increasing Social Capital

Active Transportation

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Bulletin 07: Increasing Social Capital

Summary

Providing active transportation infrastructure such as sidewalks, bike lanes, and trails, and promoting design features such as porches in front of houses, may facilitate getting people out of their cars and onto the streets and will increase their opportunity to socialize.

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Publication Date: November 30, 2009

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Bulletin 05: Built Infrastructure

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Bulletin 05: Built Infrastructure

Summary

Built infrastructure in communities refers tothe physical structures within the community that form the foundation for the development of land-use (e.g., buildings, roads, electricity). There are five elements of the built infrastructure that influence the travel behaviour of residents:1

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Publication Date: November 30, 2009

Bulletin 04: Environmental Benefits

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Bulletin 04: Environmental Benefits

Summary

There is growing evidence of the negative effects of motorized transportation on the environment. Creating active transportation systems can help reduce reliance on motorized means of transportation and increase use of sustainable modes. A shift to greater use of non-motorized means will reduce the impact on and harm to our natural environment such as air, land and water.

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Publication Date: November 30, 2009

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Bulletin 03: Economic Benefits

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Bulletin 03: Economic Benefits

Summary

There are negative economic impacts when communities are not designed to provide active transportation opportunities:

“Urban recurrent congestion costs Canadians between $2.3 billion and $3.7 billion (in 2002 dollar values). More than 90 percent of this cost is time lost in traffic by drivers and passengers; 7 percent to attributable to increased fuel consumption; and 3 percent is from increased green house gas emissions.”(p.16)

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Publication Date: November 30, 2009

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Bulletin 02: Barriers to Active Transportation

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Bulletin 02: Barriers to Active Transportation

Summary

Barriers to active transportation include both physical and social barriers. Physical barriers for those engaging in active transportation include: the inability to cross a road safely due to a large intersection and short crossing signal, lack of walkways over highways or waterways and lack of sidewalks bike lanes and bike racks. How a community is designed and its zoning and local by-laws can create barriers for those wanting to engage in active transportation.

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Publication Date: November 30, 2009

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Bulletin 01: Health Benefits

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Bulletin 01: Health Benefits

Summary

Most people engage in active transportation in some form throughout their lives. What many may not know are the health benefits associated with engaging in active transportation more often in their daily lives.

Using active transportation to move from place to place may increase your overall physical activity.

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Publication Date: November 30, 2009

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