2008 Physical Activity Monitor

This study conducted in 2008 explores individual factors in their relation to physical activity and sport, including awareness of messages, knowledge, beliefs about the benefits, attitudes, self-efficacy, behavioural control, intention, and initial steps to becoming active.

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Bulletin 07: Knowledge of Minimum Activity Required

2008 Physical Activity Monitor

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Bulletin 07: Knowledge of Minimum Activity Required

Summary

Bulletin 7 of the 2008 Physical Activity Monitor (PAM) asks Canadians what they believe to be a minimum dose of activity required of someone their own age to achieve benefits. Most Canadians aged 18 years or older are able to state all three of minimum frequency, duration, and intensity of physical activity required for health benefits

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Publication Date: January 18, 2010

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Bulletin 16: Community places and settings for physical activity

Bulletin 04: Where and how do Canadians participate in sport?

2008 Physical Activity Monitor

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Bulletin 04: Where and how do Canadians participate in sport?

Summary

Bulletin 4 of the 2008 Physical Activity Monitor (PAM) examines where and how Canadians engage in sport. Findings include that most Canadians participate in sports in structured environments, almost two thirds compete in sports, and about half train.

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Publication Date: January 18, 2010

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Bulletin 19: Awareness, Use, and Perceived Importance of the Child Fitness Tax Credit

2008 Physical Activity Monitor

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Bulletin 19: Awareness, Use, and Perceived Importance of the Child Fitness Tax Credit

Summary

Bulletin 19 of the 2008 Physical Activity Monitor (PAM) asked Canadian parents of 5 to 14 year-olds, and adults more generally, if they were aware of the Children’s Fitness Tax Credit (CFTC), and more specifically, whether they have used it or plan to use it in the future, how they would rate the importance of the CFTC in increasing physical activity (PA) among children, and if the CFTC has had an impact on their children’s enrolment in PA programs. Among Canadians aged 15 years or older, 39 percent have heard of the CFTC.

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Publication Date: January 18, 2010

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Bulletin 17: Types and Sources of Physical Activity Information

2008 Physical Activity Monitor

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Bulletin 17: Types and Sources of Physical Activity Information

Summary

Bulletin 17 of the 2008 Physical Activity Monitor (PAM) asked Canadians if additional information about physical activity (PA), such as its benefits, would be useful for them to become more active; approximately 20 percent stated that it would. Most people get their information about PA from television.

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Publication Date: January 18, 2010

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Bulletin 15: Steps Taken Towards Becoming Active

2008 Physical Activity Monitor

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Bulletin 15: Steps Taken Towards Becoming Active

Summary

Bulletin 15 of the 2008 Physical Activity Monitor (PAM) examined the steps Canadians have taken towards becoming more active within the past year, and the extent to which these steps were deemed to be helpful in actually increasing activity levels. The most common first step was making active choices at work, such as walking to work or taking the stairs.

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Publication Date: January 18, 2010

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Bulletin 14: Intention to Be Active

2008 Physical Activity Monitor

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Bulletin 14: Intention to Be Active

Summary

Bulletin 14 of the 2008 Physical Activity Monitor (PAM) asked Canadians about their intentions to become more active within the next six months. Almost half of Canadians say that they fully intend to be more active in the next six months, 45 percent have moderate-to-strong intentions, whereas 6 percent have little or no intention to become more active. The primary reason for the intention to be active was found to be staying fit or maintaining health.

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Publication Date: January 18, 2010

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Bulletin 13: Perceived Control Over Ability to Be Active

2008 Physical Activity Monitor

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Bulletin 13: Perceived Control Over Ability to Be Active

Summary

Bulletin 13 of the 2008 Physical Activity Monitor (PAM) asked Canadians about the amount of personal control they feel that they have over being able to fit regular physical activity into their lifestyle. It was found that 31% have complete control, 25% have a lot of control, 32% have only moderate control, and 12% have little to no control.

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Publication Date: January 18, 2010

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Bulletin 12: Confidence in Ability to Be Active

2008 Physical Activity Monitor

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Bulletin 12: Confidence in Ability to Be Active

Summary

Bulletin 12 of the 2008 Physical Activity Monitor (PAM) asked Canadians about their confidence (or self-efficacy) to meet guidelines set out in Canada’s Physical Activity Guide to Healthy Active Living (CPAG). Forty six percent were very confident that they could do 30 minutes of moderate or higher intensity activity on most days of the week and 37 percent were very confident that they could do 60 minutes of activity of any intensity every day of the week.

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Publication Date: January 18, 2010

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Bulletin 11: Preferred Physical Activity Routine: Is it Enough and Can it be Maintained?

2008 Physical Activity Monitor

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Bulletin 11: Preferred Physical Activity Routine: Is it Enough and Can it be Maintained?

Summary

Bulletin 11 of the 2008 Physical Activity Monitor (PAM) asked Canadians what their preferred activity routine would be if they were not constrained by circumstances. Respondents were asked to report the preferred number of days per week that they would be active, the intensity of their preferred activity, and the preferred duration per session. Overall, 80 percent of Canadians report a preferred PA routine that meets Canada’s Physical Activity Guides to Healthy Active Living for Adults and for Older Adult (CPAG).

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Publication Date: January 18, 2010

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